Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen (R) listens as U.S. President Donald Trump

WASHINGTON, DC —The Trump administration is gearing up to enforce its immigration policies in 2018, a process that is set to grossly affect hundreds of thousands of Africans and more than 5,000 Liberians currently in the United States who are out of status.

On Monday, the Trump administration canceled the Temporary Protective Status (TPS) for more than 200,000 people from El Salvador. This follows the cancellation/expiration of the TPS and Deferred Enforcement Deportation (DED) status for people from countries such as Haiti, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

On Monday, the Trump administration said it was ending the special protections for Salvadoran immigrants. The US ending special protections for Salvadoran immigrants.  Immigration analysts say the action could force nearly 200,000 people from El Salvador to leave the U.S. by September 2019 or face deportation.

Salvadorans have been, by far, the major beneficiaries of the program, which provides humanitarian relief for foreigners whose countries are hit with conflict, natural disasters or other strife.

In addition to Haiti and two other countries, El Salvador is the fourth country whose citizens have lost Temporary Protected Status under President Donald Trump. Besides, President Trump and the Department of Homeland Security have not renewed the TPS and DED status for Liberians, Guineans and Sierra Leoneans living in the United States without ‘status’ since the end of the Ebola crisis as well as the Liberian and Sierra Leone civil conflicts.


Temporary Protected Status Designated Country: Liberia | USCIS


According to reliable sources, 2018 poses a serious challenge for many African leaders as the Trump administration’s enforcement initiative plans to leave no stone unturned in its voluntary and forced deportation process in conjunction to going after corrupt African and other officials who cheat and steal from their countries and people.

Victims campaign against the ending of TPS

The U.S. president also made it clearer that countries that voted against the United States at the United Nations General Assembly should be able to handle and solve their own political and economic problems rather than rely on the United States for help when in fact they can also choose to shame the United States in global Public Square.

The Trump administration’s enforcement mandate will put huge strains on several poor and under-developed nations in sub-Sahara Africa where corruption and mismanagement have left governments broke and unable to help their people meet their basic needs.

One political and foreign affairs analyst in Washington, DC made specific reference to Liberia which recently had a presidential election and is poised to have a political transition in days.

According to sources, the country is broke and only has a balance sheet of $500, 000 dollars in its central bank after more than 449 million United States dollars was looted and shipped out, largely by officials of government.  Hence, this will pose a grave problem for the incoming Liberian administration headed by former soccer star George Manneh Weah.

With thousands of Liberians unemployed in the country, Liberians facing massive deportation from the United States may be unable to seek and obtain employment in the West Africa nation where unemployment has been at 85 percent under President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s 12 years rule.

One congressional aide in Washington, D.C., said, “It will be a good thing if the incoming Weah administration could invite and make use of the services and expertise of Liberians in the United States who have skills and experience in job creation to help the country recover and gain jobs.”

Several Africans will soon begin to pack their things like this El Salvadorean to prepare to go home.

Author Bryan Davies and few other African focus groups campaigners say they would like to urge Liberia’s president-elect Weah to reach out to Jones Nhinson Williams to help his administration in restructuring the process of small business establishment, innovation policies and job creation.

Williams currently works as the State Administrator of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics programs for the State of Maryland, and prior, he served as Maryland State Government Labor Market Information Manager during the recent global recession.

While many Liberians, Guineans, and Sierra Leoneans are not returning home voluntary due to hardship in their respective countries, Homeland Security said more than 39,000 Salvadorans have returned home from the U.S. in two years.

The agency said this demonstrates El Salvador’s capacity to absorb people. It said the 18-month delay would give Congress time to develop a legislative change if it chooses, while also giving Salvadorans and their government time to prepare. Meanwhile, there is a push from a number advocacy groups to pursue corrupt leaders in Africa.  Some of these groups say they will begin active operation in the coming months.

Some of the groups want the United States to tie foreign aid to how countries fight corruption and pursue individuals who have stolen from their own people. This, many believe, will help in halting the illegal migration process to Europe and United States.

“Corruption is the root cause of unemployment and poverty in Africa.  To stop illegal migration, we need to go after the assets of economic criminals,” said Judith Myers, an immigration advocate.

In Liberia, latest research findings point to how three former finance ministry’s officials stole more than 300 million which they distributed among top officials.